Do candles use the same amount of air to burn?

For my research project I'm going to measure how long it takes for a candle to go out in a container that holds certain amount of air. The candles are going to vary in size. I will use 30 different candles.



Candle
Volume
Time
1
5.43
23.1
2
9.05
28.9
3
16.84
20.4
4
19.91
21.8
5
21.47
23.8
6
22.11
26.7
7
23.52
22.5
8
23.92
18.6
9
24.15
29.3
10
35.13
11.8
11
38.26
16.7
12
47.63
56.1
13
49.12
47.9
14
76.34
31.6
15
83.11
14.3
16
86.28
10.7
17
94.27
19.2
18
101.34
37.3
19
106.41
39.4
20
106.58
36.5
21
127.13
19.6
22
132.37
12.5
23
165.38
17.4
24
189.21
25.2
25
189.47
25.9
26
194.23
26.4
27
203.61
31.5
28
249.57
26.2
29
256.11
14.1
30
284.39
18.3

Scatterplot.jpg

Correlation Coefficient: -0.12390

Coefficient of Determination: 0.01535

Volume Average: 99.4113

Volume Standard Deviation: 82.4287

Time Average: 25.1233

Time Standard Deviation: 10.4963


Slope: -0.007

Y - intercept: 25.321

Least Square Regression Line Equation: Y = -0.007x + 25.321


Analysis:


While I was doing this experiment, even though I used candles of the same material, it looks like the amount of wick that is coming from the candles changes the amount of light that they produce and air that they burn. I had to do different trials with the same candle and record an average time. I had to keep the candle lit for a few seconds to have a steady flame.

My results were really impressive - some big candles have a larger flame, but they use less oxygen than small ones. Before I started doing this, I thought that a bigger candle would be able to burn more wax while it was lit and would use more oxygen.

The size of the candle does not affect the amount of air that it uses to burn.